Substances & Prevention Tips

Alcohol

What is considered a drink?

A standard drink contains 0.6 ounces (14.0 grams or 1.2 tbsp) of pure alcohol. This is equal to:

  • 12-ounces of beer (5% alcohol content)
  • 8-ounces of malt liquor (7% alcohol content)
  • 5-ounces of wine (12% alcohol content)
  • 1.5-ounces of 80-proof (40% alcohol content) distilled spirits or liquor (e.g., gin, rum, vodka, whiskey)

 

Alcohol by volume (ABV) affects drinking recommendations. ABV is a standard measure of how much alcohol (ethanol) is contained in each volume of an alcoholic beverage (expressed as a volume percent). To calculate drink equivalents, multiply the volume in ounces by the alcohol content in percent and divide by 0.6 ounces of alcohol per drink equivalent.

What is moderate drinking?

  • Moderate drinking is defined as up to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men. It is not recommended that people who do not drink alcohol start drinking for any reason.

What is excessive drinking?

  • Excessive drinking includes binge drinking, heavy drinking, and any drinking by pregnant women or people younger than age 21

Binge drinking, the most common form of excessive drinking, is defined as consuming:

  • For women, 4 or more drinks during a single occasion
  • For men, 5 or more drinks during a single occasion

Heavy drinking is defined as consuming:

  • For women, 8 or more drinks per week
  • For men, 15 or more drinks per week

When not to drink?

There are some people who should not drink any alcohol, including those who are:

  • Younger than age 21
  • Pregnant or may be pregnant
  • Driving, planning to drive, or participating in other activities requiring skill, coordination, and alertness
  • Taking certain prescription or over-the-counter medications that can interact with alcohol
  • In recovery
What are the health risks related to alcohol?

Short-Term Health Risks: Excessive alcohol use has immediate effects that increase the risk of many harmful health conditions. These are most often the result of binge drinking and include the following:

  •  Injuries, such as motor vehicle crashes, falls drownings, and burns.
  • Violence, including homicide, suicide, sexual assault, and intimate partner violence.
  • Alcohol poisoning, a medical emergency that results from high blood alcohol levels.
  • Risky sexual behaviors, including unprotected sex or sex with multiple partners. These behaviors can result in unintended pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV.
  • Miscarriage and stillbirth or fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) among pregnant women.

Long-Term Health Risks: Over time, excessive alcohol use can lead to the development of chronic diseases and other serious problems including:

  • High blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, liver disease, and digestive problems.
  • Cancer of the breast, mouth, throat, esophagus, liver, and colon.
  • Learning and memory problems, including dementia and poor school performance.
  • Mental health problems, including depression and anxiety.
  • Social problems, including lost productivity, family problems, and unemployment.
  • Alcohol dependence, or addiction.

By not drinking too much, you can reduce the risk of these short and long-term health risks.

Prevention Tips for Alcohol

Short-Term Health Risks: Excessive alcohol use has immediate effects that increase the risk of many harmful health conditions. These are most often the result of binge drinking and include the following:

  •  Injuries, such as motor vehicle crashes, falls drownings, and burns.
  • Violence, including homicide, suicide, sexual assault, and intimate partner violence.
  • Alcohol poisoning, a medical emergency that results from high blood alcohol levels.
  • Risky sexual behaviors, including unprotected sex or sex with multiple partners. These behaviors can result in unintended pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV.
  • Miscarriage and stillbirth or fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) among pregnant women.

Long-Term Health Risks: Over time, excessive alcohol use can lead to the development of chronic diseases and other serious problems including:

  • High blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, liver disease, and digestive problems.
  • Cancer of the breast, mouth, throat, esophagus, liver, and colon.
  • Learning and memory problems, including dementia and poor school performance.
  • Mental health problems, including depression and anxiety.
  • Social problems, including lost productivity, family problems, and unemployment.
  • Alcohol dependence, or addiction.

By not drinking too much, you can reduce the risk of these short and long-term health risks.

Learn More About Alcohol

Visit our blog to learn more about alcohol.

 

Know the law. Thank you Division of Liquor Control #alcohol ...

During covid, it's important to use our best judgment so we can keep ourselves, our families and others safe. Drinking alcohol has been proven to impair one's best judgment to make healthy decisions. This worsens in a group factor where there may be many individuals who are under the influence of various amounts of alcohol. Stay safe during the Covid-19 pandemic and for those over the legal age to drink, please drink responsibly.
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photo credit- WHO
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#cvndc #prevention #responsible #covid #covid19 #pandemic #drinkresponsibly #immunesystem #drinking #alcohol #judgment #family #health #healthy
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In Washington County, 59% of the highschool students have ever drank alcohol. That is 4% higher than the Vermont percentage which is 55% (2019 YRBS). The best ways to prevent this is to educate those around you about the dangers of drinking at such a young age. Alcohol can be dangerous even over the legal age when not drunk responsibly and too much will damage your body. But drinking can be especially dangerous before age 25, which is when the brain is fully developed (in most cases).
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photo credit- Recovery Village
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#cvndc #prevention #preventionworks #alcohol #alcoholandteens #alcoholprevention #teens #teenalcoholprevention
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Mothers Against Drunk Driving, otherwise known as MADD, is celebrating their 40th year! They have been a driving force in the fight against drunk driving. In 2018, 10,511 people were killed due to drunk driving. Drunk driving is the #1 cause of roadway death.
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Check out the MADD website here https://www.madd.org/
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@mothersagainstdrunkdriving
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#cvndc #madd #mothersagainstdrunkdriving #prevention #preventionworks #alcohol #drunkdriving #drunkdrivers #drunkdrivingprevention
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Tobacco Products

Smoking leads to disease and disability and harms nearly every organ of the body.

More than 16 million Americans are living with a disease caused by smoking. For every person who dies because of smoking, at least 30 people live with a serious smoking related illness. Smoking causes cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung diseases, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Smoking also increases the risk of tuberculosis, certain eye diseases, and problems of the immune system, including rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Secondhand smoke exposure contributes to approximately 41,000 deaths among nonsmoking adults and 400 deaths in infants each year.

Secondhand smoke causes stroke, lung cancer, and coronary heart disease in adults. Children who are exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome, acute respiratory infections, middle ear disease, more severe asthma, respiratory symptoms, and slowed lung growth.

Tobacco use is the number one preventable cause of death.

  • In Vermont smoking costs approximately $348 million in medical expenses and results in about 1,000 smoking-related deaths each year.
  • In 2019, 28.2% of Vermont high school youth reported currently using a tobacco product, including e-cigarettes. Among Vermont high school youth, 6.9% reported currently smoking cigarettes.
  • In 2017, 9.4% of high school students in Vermont smoked cigars, cigarillos or little cigars on at least one day in the past 30 days. Nationally, the rate was 8.0%.

    Smokeless Tobacco

    There are four general types of smokeless tobacco available in the United States: chew, snuff, snus, and dissolvable tobacco. New oral nicotine pouches and lozenges are a new category of tobacco product that comes in many flavors and is increasing in popularity. The products are still derived from tobacco and contain nicotine, but due to the absence of tobacco leaf, the Food and Drug Administration does not classify it as a smokeless tobacco product. Some of these products also claim to use synthetic nicotine, which has not yet been regulated by the FDA.

    • Smokeless tobacco use has been stable since 2002. In 2015, national statistics showed that 6% of high school students used smokeless tobacco in the past 30 days. In 2017, 5.2% of high school students in Vermont used chewing tobacco, snuff or dip on at least one day in the past 30 days.
    • E-Cigarettes and Vaping
      • Just when smoking prevalence has declined significantly among adults and youth in Vermont over the last decade, use of electronic cigarettes has increased dramatically. Vaping is easily recognized as one of the most popular substance use trends among teens. Vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling an aerosol, often incorrectly referred to as a vapor, produced by an e-cigarette, vape pen, or similar device. These devices contain flavored e-liquids, nicotine and/or cannabis/marijuana. According to the CDC’s National Youth Tobacco Survey, 1 in 5 high school students reported vaping in the past month.
    • Modified e-cigarette devices can be used to deliver non nicotine substances, such as cannabis extract or honey oil. E cigarette aerosol can contain harmful substances, including nicotine, heavy metals such as lead, volatile organic compounds and cancer-causing chemicals.
    • Exposure to nicotine during adolescence through young adulthood can disrupt the formation of brain circuits that control attention and learning because the brain is not fully developed until the mid-20s. Nicotine activates the limbic system more strongly in the adolescent brain than in the adult brain, making addiction a significantly greater risk for youth who use nicotine. Young people are also at risk for long-term effects of exposing their brains to nicotine, including mood disorders and permanent lowering of impulse control. Some newer electronic vapor products available on the market, such as the popular brand JUUL, have nicotine salts in their liquid or pod. This makes the nicotine more readily absorbed into the bloodstream and makes the vapor less harsh, so that it’s easier to inhale more nicotine for longer periods of time.

    A note about flavors

    • It is well established that flavors play a significant role in enticing youth and young adults to try and use tobacco products.
    • The chemical compound menthol, for example, makes cigarettes easier to smoke and harder to quit. Menthol creates a cooling effect, reduces the harshness of cigarette smoke and suppresses coughing. Those effects may make menthol cigarettes more appealing to young, inexperienced smokers, and research shows that they are more likely to addict youth.
    • Federal law bans flavors in cigarettes, excluding menthol however, and currently the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prioritizes enforcement against non-menthol flavors in cartridge-based e-cigarettes, but not in other tobacco products, such as open system e-cigarettes, disposable e-cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, cigars, and hookahs. These products come in an array of candy, fruit, dessert and cocktail flavors, such as sour apple, cherry, grape, chocolate, strawberry margarita, appletini, pina colada, cotton candy and cinnamon roll. Flavored tobacco products also typically have bright, colorful packages and are often sold individually and cheaply, making them even more appealing to youth and young adults. In April 2021, the administration and FDA announced they will begin the process within the year for rulemaking to prohibit the sale of menthol cigarettes and all flavored cigars. To date, FDA has not issued any proposed rules.
      Prevention Tips for Tobacco Products

      Most people who smoke know that smoking is bad for their health and harmful to those around them. In fact, in recent studies, it’s shown that 7 out of 10 smokers want to quit smoking. That is why since 2012 the Centers for Disease Control has been educating the public about the consequences of smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke and encouraging smokers to quit through a federally funded, national tobacco education campaign, Tips from Former Smokers®. The campaign features former smokers suffering from the real consequences of smoking. 

      The Tips® campaign connects smokers with resources to help them quit, including a quit line number (1-800-QUIT-NOW) which routes callers to their state quit line. The Vermont quit line (802Quits) provides free cessation services, including counseling and medication. These services are effective in improving health outcomes and reducing healthcare costs. 

      Here are some helpful tips to help you on the path to success: 

      • Focus on your motivators. Motivation waxes and wanes and this is 100 percent normal—what can you do to increase your motivation when you feel defeated or low? 
      • Build confidence. Confidence that your attempt will be successful is important. What can you do to increase your confidence levels? Your confidence can increase when you make and achieve a series of small goals, when you visualize your success and when you feel like you have the tools ready for any situation. 
      • Stress management is key. Many smokers smoke to manage stress, distress, and negative emotions. Being prepared with other ways to manage these feelings can be difficult and takes a lot of practice. What do your non-smoking friends do to manage stress? 
      • It’s never too late to quit. While it’s best to quit smoking as early as possible, quitting smoking at any age will enhance the length and quality of your life. You’ll also save money and avoid the hassle of going outside in the cold to smoke. You can even inspire those around you to quit smoking. 
      • Learn from past experiences. Most people who smoke have tried to quit before and sometimes they get discouraged thinking about previous attempts. But these experiences tell us a lot about what to do and what not to do next time! These experiences are steps on the road to future success. Think about what worked for you last time, what didn’t work and what you might do differently this time. 
      • You don’t have to quit alone. Telling friends and family that you’re trying to quit and enlisting their support will help ease the process. Friends who also smoke may even join you in trying to quit. 
      • Medications are safe and effective and will help you quit and stay quit when used properly. The seven FDA-approved medications include nicotine patches, gum, lozenges, inhaler, and nasal spray as well as varenicline (Chantix) and bupropion (Zyban). Ask your healthcare provider for recommendations. The medications help with withdrawal symptoms, urges and cravings, but do not help with the habit or with managing stress or negative emotions. Be sure to follow the directions and combine medications with other tools for quitting. 

      Be a champion in your community for preventing substance misuse. Every community needs that advocate who is willing to stand up, go to meetings, and advocate for change. Contact wroberts.cvndc@gmail.com to find out more.

      Learn More About Tobacco Products

      Visit our blog to learn more about tobacco.

       

      Smoking can affect your ability to be active and your stamina
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      For FREE quitting resources visit 802quits.org
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      #cvndc #prevention #preventionworks #goldenretriever #ollie #luna #tobacco #tobaccoprevention #802 #vt #802quits
      ...

      PUFF Bars came into the market in 2019, however it appears that this was done illegally because of a piece of legislation regarding vaping that was supposed to prohibit companies from selling new vape products that weren’t on the market before 2016. While PUFF Bar themselves aren’t selling in the US, many vape shops are still selling PUFF Bars and various copycat vapes.
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      #education #prevention #awareness #THISISQUITTING #CVNDC #preventionworks #PUFFBARS #FDA #tobacco #vapesarelethal #fda #notapproved
      ...

      Cannabis

      The term “cannabis” is now the more preferred word for this substance commonly known as marijuana.

      This is mostly due to a racially charged history connected to the use of the word marijuana. It is important to note that in Vermont’s Act 164,  the legislature mandated that “Marijuana” be changed to “Cannabis” in all laws. For this purpose, the term cannabis refers to the drug, including anything containing more than .03% THC (products with .03% or less THC are labeled as Hemp). 

      Cannabis refers to the dried leaves, flowers, stems, and or seeds from the cannabis sativa or cannabis indica plant.

      • The plant contains the mind-altering chemical THC and other similar compounds. Extracts, which can also be made from the cannabis plant, may include shatter, wax, butane hash oil, budder, and tinctures.
      • Cannabis is the most used addictive drug after tobacco and alcohol. Its use is widespread among young people. Nationally, in 2018, more than 11.8 million young adults used cannabis in the past year. According to the Monitoring the Future survey, rates of past year cannabis use among middle and high school students have remained steady, but the number of teens in 8th and 10th grades who say they use it daily has increased.
      • With the growing popularity of vaping devices, teens have started vaping THC (the ingredient in cannabis that produces the high), with nearly 4% of 12th graders saying they vape THC daily. In addition, the number of young people who believe regular cannabis use is risky is decreasing.
      • Data shows more Vermonters (ages 12 and up) are using cannabis compared to the country overall. The number of Vermonters who have tried cannabis for the first time, between the ages of 12 and 17, is also higher in our state than in the country overall.
      • Cannabis can have negative impacts on the adolescent brain which is still developing until the age of 25. As the brain develops from back to front, the last part to fully form is the prefrontal cortex which is the area responsible for executive functioning including planning, decision making, establishing and completing goals, and problem solving. Teen brains are constantly under construction and are forming connections from their experiences. It is great when they are learning a new language or how to play a musical instrument but they are also susceptible to the lasting effects of THC in cannabis products. Early adolescent use can result in panic and paranoia, impaired coordination, slowed reaction time, reduced emotional control, lack of judgment, and can interfere with motivation, attention span, and concentration.
      • In addition to interfering with brain development, regular cannabis use has been linked to anxiety, depression and suicide, especially for teens with a family history of mental illness. Cannabis use can increase the risk of psychosis and schizophrenia in some individuals. The more cannabis you use, the higher the risk. Using cannabis as a teen can lead to cannabis dependence and increase your risk for using or abusing other substances and illegal drugs. Cannabis Use Disorder is a familiar diagnosis now and treatment can address this.
      • The way cannabis plants are grown has changed over the past few decades. Many plants now contain higher amounts of THC. The higher the THC content, the stronger the effects on your brain and behavior. Higher levels of THC may result from newer methods of using cannabis like dabbing, vaping, and/or consuming edibles. Vaping any substance carries a risk for respiratory and lung problems from the flavors, additives and high temperatures creating toxic substances which are harmful to the lungs.
      • Secondhand smoke causes stroke, lung cancer, and coronary heart disease in adults. Children who are exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome, acute respiratory infections, middle ear disease, more severe asthma, respiratory symptoms, and slowed lung growth.

      Synthetic Cannabinoids

      • Synthetic cannabinoids (K2, spice, spike) are not actually cannabis, but are made from another type of plant and sprayed with chemicals produced in a laboratory. All synthetic cannabinoids are illegal in Vermont. Synthetic cannabinoids affect your brain more powerfully than cannabis, and may result in nausea, anxiety, paranoia, brain swelling, seizures, hallucinations, aggression, heart palpitations or chest pains. If someone you know has used synthetic cannabinoids and needs help, call 9-1-1 immediately.
      Prevention Tips for Cannabis Products

      It’s never too early to start a conversation with your kids about drugs and alcohol. When young people have supportive adults in their lives, they are much less likely to use drugs. Open, honest conversations are the best way to influence their behavior.

      Talking about the facts and myths of cannabis is essential. Why Talk? Because talking with your children about substances helps keep them safe. Open and honest conversations with your child about the risks of cannabis makes them less likely to experiment. It may feel awkward, but your kids are actually waiting to hear from you.

      The following are tips for keeping the conversation going. Nothing makes teens shut down faster than an angry, judgmental or lecturing parent. For a productive conversation now, and an open door for future conversations, do your best to keep it natural and positive.

      • Get yourself centered before approaching your child. If you’re upset, try doing some yoga, going for a walk or just taking a few deep breaths before engaging with them. 
      • Instead of having “the talk,” look for opportunities to work your concerns into everyday conversations. Find settings that offer privacy but don’t feel too constricting or distracting, like talking while walking the dog or going for a drive. 
      • Look for ways to praise what your teen is doing right. Express concern—rather than judgment—where needed. For example, instead of saying you’re “disappointed,” let them know you’re “worried.” Praise the good in them, playing to their sense of self-respect. 
      • Ask questions that encourage your child to elaborate and show you’re hearing by repeating back what they said. Don’t cut the conversation short—make sure they’ve expressed everything they need to. 
      • Instead of horror stories, stick to discussing real-life consequences and the good reasons to avoid drugs and alcohol. Try brainstorming ideas for situations with them, like turning down drugs, or how to contact you in a risky situation. 
      • It’s good to have a goal when going into a talk with your teen. But if you don’t get there on the first (or second or even third) try, don’t sweat it. Getting through to your teen can take time, and it’s often better to come back to it later than to force a confrontation. 
      • Start early, before they’re hearing about substances from peers. Keep an open dialogue about cannabis, alcohol, tobacco, media influences, emotions, and other issues. Explain your rules and expectations. Return to these conversations often as your child grows. 
      • Consistently showing interest in your child’s daily life helps you build trust and openness. That way you don’t suddenly surprise them with “the talk” about drugs. Check in with your teen every day, then set aside family time once a week for longer conversations. 
      • As your teen ages, it becomes more important to offer detailed and proven facts about cannabis and any other issues. If your teen is looking forward to college or a career, talk about how drugs and alcohol could get in the way of achieving their goals. 
      • Be a champion in your community for preventing substance misuse. Every community needs that advocate who is willing to stand up, go to meetings, and advocate for change. Contact info.cvndc@gmail.com to find out more. 
      Learn More About Cannabis

      Visit our blog to learn more about cannabis.

       

      A startling stat from our friends at Families in Action #cannabis ...

      As more states legalize or decriminalize the use of marijuana, commercial fleet operators around the country are ramping up their reasonable suspicion training to manage the risk of drivers operating vehicles under the influence of the drug, experts say.

      Thirty-six states and Washington, D.C., have legalized marijuana in some form. However, it remains federally illegal and subject to U.S. Department of Transportation testing requirements for commercial driver’s license holders.

      Data from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse — which began collecting data on CDL license holders’ positive drug tests as of Jan. 6, 2020 — shows that of 80,000 failed alcohol and drug tests since then, more than half were due to positive results for marijuana metabolites. #cannabis
      ...

      Mark your calendars! From our partners at the VT Dept. of Health on 9/7/21 and 9/9/21, the Current Cannabis Trends and Impacts webinar. #cannabis ...

      45% of Washington County high school students have tried cannabis (2019 YRBS). Cannabis can be addictive and lead to use of other drugs. Cannabis impairs the brain, cognitive functions and reaction time.
      If you or someone you know needs help with cannabis use, please visit vthelplink.org

      #cvndc #mentalhealthawareness #cannabisprevention #yrbs #prevention #preventionworks #cannabis
      ...

      Prescription Drugs

      Did you know that 1 in 11 Washington County high-school students has misused a prescription (Rx) stimulant or opiate (pain reliever), not prescribed to them, at least once? (source: 2019 Vermont Youth Risk Behavior Survey – Washington County). More than half of people who misuse prescription medication get it from a friend or relative.

      The term prescription refers to medicines that are safe and effective when used under a doctor’s care, whereas nonprescription or over the counter (OTC) drugs are medicines the FDA determines are safe and effective for use without a doctor’s prescription. Used as prescribed and directed, medicine improves lives.

      While some people misuse certain types of medicine to “get high,” many are simply trying to cope with or manage the stress in their lives. Prescription stimulants, pain relievers, sedatives and tranquilizers, and even over-the-counter cough medicine are commonly misused or abused for these reasons.

      One of the types of prescription drugs that are misused are opioids. Opioids are a class of drugs that include heroin, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, and prescription pain relievers such as hydrocodone (e.g., Vicodin®), oxycodone (e.g., OxyContin®, Percocet®), oxymorphone (e.g., Opana®), morphine (e.g., Kadian®, Avinza®), Tylenol® with codeine and more. Opioids have been used for hundreds of years to address pain and, since the 1990’s, to treat chronic pain.

      According to the 2019 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), 9% of Vermont high school students reported ever misusing a prescription pain medication. Most were obtained from friends and family members or the home medicine cabinet. Safe disposal of prescription medications helps to reduce the access which may lead to misuse, poisoning, and addiction. Expired and unused medications can be deposited in collection boxes at local police stations or be mailed off in pre-paid mailback envelopes available at area libraries and community centers.

       

      Prevention Tips for Prescription Drug Abuse

      Prescription opioid pain medications are a growing problem—both in Vermont and nationwide. In 2017 alone, around 769,000 teens (12–17) said they misused opioids and over 72,000 people died from opioid misuse in the U.S. That’s one death every 11 minutes. Here are some important things to remember when you have an opioid prescription:

      Don’t consume alcohol while using opioids

      • Even a small amount of alcohol can increase your risk of overdose. 
      • Opioids and alcohol are both depressants that slow your breathing, which can prevent oxygen from reaching organs like your lungs, heart, and brain. 
      • Mixing with alcohol can cause the rapid release and absorption of dangerous and potentially fatal amounts of opioids into your system. 

      Stop using as soon as your pain is manageable

      • Addiction can happen in as few as 5 consecutive days of use. 
      • Prescriptions for over 7 days are rarely needed, as opioids are not meant for long-term pain and taking more than you need builds up a tolerance in your body. 
      • The Centers for Disease Control advises that prescription opioids should only be taken for 3 days or less for acute pain, such as pain from surgery. 

      Never share your prescription

      • A dose that is safe for you does not mean it is safe for others. 
      • Prescription doses are based on a variety of personal factors, such as history of substance use, tolerance, and other health information. 
      • 53% of people who misused prescription pain relievers got them from a friend or relative. 

      Store opioids in a secure place and safely get rid of unused medication

      • Nearly 70% of prescription opioids kept in homes with children are not stored safely. 
      • People who misuse prescription medications often receive pills from a friend’s or relative’s medicine cabinet. 
      • Keep opioids out of reach in a locked or well-hidden place. 
      • Get rid of your unused pills quickly and safely by mailing them in using a free prepaid mail-back envelope or by dropping them off a safe disposal site. 

      Be a champion in your community for preventing substance abuse. Every community needs that advocate who is willing to stand up, go to meetings, and advocate for change. Contact info.cvndc@gmail.com to find out more.

      Learn More About Prescription Drugs

      Visit our blog to learn more about prescription drugs.

       

      Tomorrow from 10-2pm in a wide variety of Washington County locations. #prescriptiondrugs ...

      Mark your calendars! Take Back Day, from 10-2pm on Saturday, October 23rd. #prescriptiondrugs ...

      Remember, Take Back Day is only 10 days away! Visit our website for more information. #prescriptiondrugs ...

      The good news is that for some opioids, use is in decline (from the National Institute on Drug Abuse) #prescriptiondrugs ...

      Other Substances

      There are many other substances that can cause harm and possible addiction. Some examples are: